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The Resource The speeches of Frederick Douglass : a critical edition, John R. McKivigan, Julie Husband, Heather L. Kaufman, editors

The speeches of Frederick Douglass : a critical edition, John R. McKivigan, Julie Husband, Heather L. Kaufman, editors

Label
The speeches of Frederick Douglass : a critical edition
Title
The speeches of Frederick Douglass
Title remainder
a critical edition
Statement of responsibility
John R. McKivigan, Julie Husband, Heather L. Kaufman, editors
Creator
Contributor
Author
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Biography type
contains biographical information
Cataloging source
YDX
Dewey number
326/.8092
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
E449
LC item number
.D68 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Label
The speeches of Frederick Douglass : a critical edition, John R. McKivigan, Julie Husband, Heather L. Kaufman, editors
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Illustrations; Preface; Introduction: Frederick Douglass's Oratory and Political Leadership; Part 1: Selected Speeches by Frederick Douglass; "I Have Come to Tell You Something about Slavery" (1841); "Temperance and Anti-Slavery" (1846); "American Slavery, American Religion, and the Free Church of Scotland" (1846); "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?" (1852); "A Nation in the Midst of a Nation" (1853); "The Claims of the Negro Ethnologically Considered" (1854); "The American Constitution and the Slave" (1860); "The Mission of the War" (1864)"Sources of Danger to the Republic" (1867); "Let the Negro Alone" (1869); "We Welcome the Fifteenth Amendment" (1869); "Our Composite Nationality" (1869); "Which Greeley Are We Voting For?" (1872); "Recollections of the Anti-Slavery Conflict" (1873); "The Freedmen's Monument to Abraham Lincoln" (1876); "This Decision Has Humbled the Nation" (1883); " 'It Moves,' or the Philosophy of Reform" (1883); "I Am a Radical Woman Suffrage Man" (1888); "Self-Made Men" (1893); "Lessons of the Hour" (1894) -- Part 2: Known Influences on Frederick Douglass's Oratory; Caleb Bingham, from The Columbian Orator (1817); Henry Highland Garnet, from "An Address to the Slaves of the United States of America" (1843); Samuel Ringgold Ward, "Speech Denouncing Daniel Webster's Endorsement of the Fugitive Slave Law" (1850); Wendell Phillips, from "Toussaint L'Ouverture" (1863) -- Part 3: Frederick Douglass on Public Speaking; Frederick Douglass, "Give Us the Facts," from My Bondage and My Freedom (1855); Frederick Douglass, "One Hundred Conventions" (1843), from Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (1881; 1892); Frederick Douglass, "Letter from the Editor" (1849), from the Rochester North Star; Frederick Douglass, "A New Vocation before Me" (1870), from Life and Times; Frederick Douglass, "People Want to Be Amused as Well as Instructed" (1871), Letter to James Redpath; Frederick Douglass, "Great Is the Miracle of Human Speech" (1891), from the Washington (D.C.) Evening Star -- Part 4: Contemporary Commentary on Frederick Douglass as an Orator; Nathaniel Peabody Rogers, from "Rhode Island Anti-Slavery Meeting" (1841); William J. Wilson, "A Leaf from My Scrap Book: Samuel R. Ward and Frederick Douglass" (1849); Thurlow G. Weed, from "A Colored Man's Eloquence" (1853); William Wells Brown, from The Rising Son (1874); Elizabeth Cady Stanton, "An 1895 Public Letter from Elizabeth Cady Stanton on the Occasion of Frederick Douglass's Death," from In Memoriam: Frederick Douglass, ed. Helen Douglass (1897); Thomas Wentworth Higginson, from American Orators and Oratory (1901) -- Part 5: Modern Scholarly Criticism of Frederick Douglass as an Orator
Control code
on1024164848
Dimensions
21 cm
Extent
xxxix, 645 pages
Isbn
9780300192179
Lccn
2017963811
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(OCoLC)1024164848
Label
The speeches of Frederick Douglass : a critical edition, John R. McKivigan, Julie Husband, Heather L. Kaufman, editors
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Illustrations; Preface; Introduction: Frederick Douglass's Oratory and Political Leadership; Part 1: Selected Speeches by Frederick Douglass; "I Have Come to Tell You Something about Slavery" (1841); "Temperance and Anti-Slavery" (1846); "American Slavery, American Religion, and the Free Church of Scotland" (1846); "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?" (1852); "A Nation in the Midst of a Nation" (1853); "The Claims of the Negro Ethnologically Considered" (1854); "The American Constitution and the Slave" (1860); "The Mission of the War" (1864)"Sources of Danger to the Republic" (1867); "Let the Negro Alone" (1869); "We Welcome the Fifteenth Amendment" (1869); "Our Composite Nationality" (1869); "Which Greeley Are We Voting For?" (1872); "Recollections of the Anti-Slavery Conflict" (1873); "The Freedmen's Monument to Abraham Lincoln" (1876); "This Decision Has Humbled the Nation" (1883); " 'It Moves,' or the Philosophy of Reform" (1883); "I Am a Radical Woman Suffrage Man" (1888); "Self-Made Men" (1893); "Lessons of the Hour" (1894) -- Part 2: Known Influences on Frederick Douglass's Oratory; Caleb Bingham, from The Columbian Orator (1817); Henry Highland Garnet, from "An Address to the Slaves of the United States of America" (1843); Samuel Ringgold Ward, "Speech Denouncing Daniel Webster's Endorsement of the Fugitive Slave Law" (1850); Wendell Phillips, from "Toussaint L'Ouverture" (1863) -- Part 3: Frederick Douglass on Public Speaking; Frederick Douglass, "Give Us the Facts," from My Bondage and My Freedom (1855); Frederick Douglass, "One Hundred Conventions" (1843), from Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (1881; 1892); Frederick Douglass, "Letter from the Editor" (1849), from the Rochester North Star; Frederick Douglass, "A New Vocation before Me" (1870), from Life and Times; Frederick Douglass, "People Want to Be Amused as Well as Instructed" (1871), Letter to James Redpath; Frederick Douglass, "Great Is the Miracle of Human Speech" (1891), from the Washington (D.C.) Evening Star -- Part 4: Contemporary Commentary on Frederick Douglass as an Orator; Nathaniel Peabody Rogers, from "Rhode Island Anti-Slavery Meeting" (1841); William J. Wilson, "A Leaf from My Scrap Book: Samuel R. Ward and Frederick Douglass" (1849); Thurlow G. Weed, from "A Colored Man's Eloquence" (1853); William Wells Brown, from The Rising Son (1874); Elizabeth Cady Stanton, "An 1895 Public Letter from Elizabeth Cady Stanton on the Occasion of Frederick Douglass's Death," from In Memoriam: Frederick Douglass, ed. Helen Douglass (1897); Thomas Wentworth Higginson, from American Orators and Oratory (1901) -- Part 5: Modern Scholarly Criticism of Frederick Douglass as an Orator
Control code
on1024164848
Dimensions
21 cm
Extent
xxxix, 645 pages
Isbn
9780300192179
Lccn
2017963811
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(OCoLC)1024164848

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